If you have children, determining the custody and/or access arrangements for the children will be one of the most important issues to navigate during your separation. Determining your children’s best interests, and making the transition as easy as possible for them should be your top priority.

One of the most common questions is about the difference between sole and joint custody. However, there are many different types of custody arrangements:

Sole custody means that one parent makes all major decisions about the children, including healthcare, education, and religious decisions. The other parent exercises access to the children, so that they maintain emotional connections.

Joint custody means that both parents share in making major decisions about the children, including healthcare, education, and religious decisions.

Shared custody exists when children live with each parent at least 40 per cent of the time. The parents share in the care and responsibility of the children. In these circumstances, special provisions apply to the calculation of child support, depending on the amount of time children spend with each parent.

Split custody is possible where there is more than one child, and each parent has custody of at least one child.